Bodybuilder Samson Dauda posing in gym

3 MOVES FOR A BIGGER CHEST

IFBB Pro bodybuilder Samson Dauda takes us through his chest workout two weeks out from competing in the Europa Championship Pro in Alicante, Spain. Workout fueled by HOSSTILITY Grape Bubble Gum.

 

 

 

Looking to pack on some serious mass to your chest? Samson shows that you don’t have to reinvent the wheel to maximize muscle growth. This workout takes three basic chest movements and shows you how to get the most out of each. Samson has found taking a simpler approach to his chest training has worked best for his chest development. He sticks to three big basic chest movements, progressively making the movements harder rather than trying to change up the exercises all of the time. 

Smith Machine Incline Press

Begin by setting up an incline bench inside of a smith machine. In order to put focus on the upper chest, align the bench so that the bar comes down just below the collar bones. Samson starts off with a light set of 20-25 reps to warm up and drive blood into his pecs. For each of the next sets, Samson increases weight and completes 10-12 reps. He will keep climbing weight on each set until he reaches failure at 10-12 reps. Once failure is attained on the last set, he drops the weight down and immediately performs as many reps as he can. He does this twice.

Hammer Strength Flat Press

Samson follows the same method as noted above for this exercise. At this point in his prep he is straying away from free weights, allowing him to keep intensity high but also decreasing risk of injury. The flat angle allows him to put emphasis on the mid and lower parts of his chest. He is doing 4 sets of 10-12 repetitions, working up to failure on his last set followed by a double drop set.

Pec Deck Flye

Here Samson is really focusing on the stretch and contraction of the movement. This allows him to completely burn out his chest at the end of his workout. He completes 4-5 sets of 10 reps. On the last set he does a 5 second concentric (moving the weight) followed by a slow and controlled eccentric (returning the weight back).